Best Bike Pumps For 2022? Best. Smart. Quality

A bike pump is an essential tool if you are a cyclist. No matter what types of your bike and what types of your tires, if the pressure in the bike tires is low, you will get a flat. In this situation, if you have a bike pump at hand, you will feel delightful. A bike pump is used to inflate the bike tires. If the pressure in the tire is lower than the recommended pressure, it’s to inflate it with your bike pump.

Why do you need a pump? It’s mainly because your tube is made of rubber. Rubber is in fact microscopically porous, so the tires will lose its pressure periodically. Before riding, it’s really important to check the tires have got enough pressure. If not, you must inflate the tires to the recommended pressure. This is why you need a bike pump. Because a good bike pump can save both your money and time. So remember to keep a floor pump at the house, check the pressure and inflate your tires, and then ride your bike. By doing this, you can avoid getting a flat tire while riding. If that happens, you may pay $15 to $25 for replacing the tube in a bike shop. What’s more, floor pumps don’t cost you more.
 
A floor pump is an essential bike pump for you. Here is a list of the best floor pumps you can choose for your bike.

Thom Taylor By, Thom Taylor
  • New 3" mid-mount gauge
  • New hammer style TwinHead DX with extra long 360 pivot hose works with all tire valves
  • 【Generous Length Air Hose】: The air hose is a generous 47.2 inches long, and originates near the top of the pump, making it a breeze to reach one's tire valve in any position, even up on a raised surface or in a work stand.
  • Born in World Top Manufacturer and Factory Directly Sale- BETO factory located in Taiwan, world excellence for cycling products like GIANT, BETO is also the 1st bike pump factory over the world, it produces bike pumps for many well-known brand owners like BELL
  • 38mm diameter high volume steel barrel is 21 inch high to offer premium performance
  • Dual easy indicator pump head fits both Shrader and Presta valves indicator is green when locked and ready to use and red when it's not
  • Smart Valve Design: can be used with both Presta and Schrader
  • Sport Ball Needle and Inflatable Device: Can be used on inflating sport balls and pool floats or water tubes
  • 【Detachable Carried accessory box】TOOLITIN bicycle air pump adopts a new-style protective box design, the accessories are placed in the protective box, instead of sticking to the base like an ordinary bicycle air pump accessories, which is easy to store and not easy to lose
  • 【Accurate Pressure Gauge】- Max 160 PSI / 11 Bar high pressure capacity, ergonomic bicycle floor pump with pressure gauge , accurate air pressure can be displayed when inflated, making it easier to visually see and fit easily into the proper pressure prevents accidental tire blowouts.
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Best Bike Pumps

1. Topeak JoeBlow Max II Floor Bike Pump

This floor pump is from Topeak who is the top line bike accessories manufacturer. Although the name Joeblow is not ideal, the Topeak JoeBlow Max II Floor Bike Pump can do anything for you. On the bottom, there is a gauge that helps you read the pressure while pumping. A dual-sided nozzle at the end of hose means this pump can work with both Schrader and Presta valves. This pump has a capacity of 120 psi. It also comes with accessories which you use to pump up your sport balls like football or basketball. If you have a bike, we highly recommend getting this floor pump.

2. Serfas TCPG Bicycle Floor Pump

This pump is cheaper than Joeblow. It has much more features that JoeBlow doesn’t. This bike pump can go to 160psi compared with JoeBlow’s 120psi. Road bikes require high pressure. This pump is qualified. A gauge is also equipped. A simple pump head can fit well with both Schrader and Presta valves. Some other pumps may have a dual-sided nozzle which may be tedious when you are pumping up from different types of tires. However, the single head may wear out quickly, but it is more efficient and intuitive.

3. Planet Bike 1002-3 ALX Floor Pump

Like Serfas TCPG Bicycle Floor Pump, this one can go to 160PSI. It has a similar nozzle like Topeak JoeBlow. The ergonomically designed handle is much more comfortable while pumping. Also a gauge is mounted on the pump shaft, which makes it easy to read. What’s more, a lifetime warranty is also included.

4. Schwinn Air Driver 1000 Floor Pump

If you are looking for a simplified pump which just inflates the tires, this Schwinn Air Driver 1000 Floor Pump is the one you are looking for. It can work with both Schrader and Presta valves. A built-in needle can be used to pump up other sports balls. Although the gauge isn’t equipment, you get one gauge for $5 or more if you like. The heavy-duty designed cartridge makes it more reliable.

5. Bell Windstorm Floor Pump with Gauge

Why chooses this pump? It is so cheap that you can use it for several times and don’t feel a waste of money. The price is only 50% of other bike pumps; meanwhile the quality is the same. It is designed by a cheaper manufacturer. Its nozzle only works with Schrader valves. It can go to 120PSI. The larger chamber makes it easy to pump. Also a gauge is included. Don’t expect it can last more than one season. It is just a replacement of our best bike pump for temporary use.

Things to consider when buying a bike pump?

Pressure needed

Not many people really need a pump that goes to 260psi and even a committed mountain biker probably won’t need above 40psi. A higher-pressure pump is often a trade-off for volume output, or at least gauge accuracy. Because of this, brands such as Lezyne offer pump models specific to road or mountain biking.

Volume needed

Much like pressure, this will depend on your main bike choice. A high-volume pump will mean it takes fewer strokes to reach your desired pressure, but in turn, will generally mean a lower maximum pressure.

As mountain bike tyres have far greater volume (and lower pressure), a large-volume pump is more important here. If you have tubeless tyres, a pump with a massive volume output may be enough to seat a tyre without needing an air compressor.

Gauge accuracy

Few hand pumps include a gauge, but any decent track pump should.

Look for a gauge that’s easy to read and offers a suitable pressure range for your needs. Gauges are generally most accurate at the middle of the range, so if you’re trying to accurately inflate your mountain bike tyre between 23 and 25psi you’ll need a gauge with a low-pressure accuracy (or just a separate pressure gauge).

A pump with a digital gauge is also an option if you’re looking at more expensive options.

Pump heads and valve types

Presta (racing style) and Schrader (like on a car) are two of the most common valve types. Nearly all pumps these days will cater for at least Presta and Schrader, but not all are as simple as others.

Some pumps are valve-specific, others must be changed internally to fit various valves. A twin-valve head will have two separate slots for either valve, while a ‘smart-head’ will automatically adjust to the various valve sizes. Then there’s the thread-on style, which offers a reliable fit, but needs to be ‘flipped and changed’ depending on your desired valve.

If you use tubes or tubeless valves with a removable core, just be aware that some thread-on pump heads can unscrew the valve once inflated. For this style of valve, more common press-on style heads are best.

If you run tubeless tyres, check out our list of the best tubeless pumps and inflators.

Size

If your pump is going to stay at home, size isn’t going to be of great concern. But if you’re planning to carry your pump on a ride or take it in the car, then it’s an important factor in your decision. The smallest mini-pumps will eventually inflate a tyre, but are obviously limited on air volume.

Weight

Much like size, weight isn’t a concern if the pump is going to be left at home, and here, a sturdy pump that doesn’t topple over is a bonus. But if you’re looking to carry it with you, then you don’t want anything too heavy.

The most expensive pumps are now made with lightweight aluminium, but there are plenty of plastic options, which are perfectly acceptable too. Don’t trade low-weight for something that’s just not suited to your needs, but at the same time, there’s no point carrying extra weight if you don’t have to.

Construction

The quality of a pump’s construction is often in line with its price, and generally speaking the more expensive the pump, the more metal it contains.

For track pumps, the cheapest options are plastic and will flex and wobble under heavy use, eventually giving up. The metal ones are far more solid, keep going and are well worth rebuilding.

Serviceability

Serviceability generally applies to the more expensive pumps, which can be seen as a long-term investment.

Most main brands will offer a range of common spares to keep your pumps working. The most important spares are the head and valve gaskets because these will wear and begin to leak over time.

Conclusion

Don’t buy an expensive pump if spares are not readily available.


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Thom Taylor By, Thom Taylor